CD REVIEW: PAUL BUTTERFIELD – Live, New York 1970

CD REVIEW: PAUL BUTTERFIELD – Live, New York 1970
Rock Beat Records
April 2017
Reviewed by Shane Pinnegar
9/10

Paul Butterfield is unfairly not remembered as universally as some of his contemporaries, but his importance in the evolution of the blues shouldn’t be underestimated.

One of – if not the – first racially integrated bands, they challenged the prevalent racism of the ‘60s whilst leading the blues from the sharecropper plantations into soul and funk territory, captured beautifully on this excellent recording of a show recorded in front of a small audience at A&R Recording Studios for radio broadcast sponsored by the Singer Sewing Machine Company.

The band – David Sanborn on sax, Gene Sinwiddie on sax and flute and vocals, drummer Dennis Whitted, trumpeter Steve Madaio, Rod Hicks on bass, Trevor Lawrence on sax, and guitarist Ralph Walsh – are in excellent form here, and all get ample chance to shine. There’s even a bass solo on Play On!

That track is allowed to flow into nine minutes of blues rock jam, and the likes of Albert King’s Born Under A Bad Sign also get extended workouts on this excellent, historical double album.

CD REVIEW: PAUL BUTTERFIELD – Live, New York 1970

Filed Under: CD Reviews

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